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are not in a position to be held hostage by anybody. it also focuses on find more and use less. what we can do in the federal government is i think invest in research and getting a 500-mile battery for electric cars and getting solar energy that is 1 kilowatt installed and finding a way to capture carbon from coal plants that can be turned into fuel that is commercially sold. we should look at the model of unconventional gas in terms of how our system and federal research and our system of private properties have produced a situation where we have a massive advantage over europe and asia in terms of our natural gas. it creates a better economy and that reduces the debt. >> there is a headline predicting we will be producing more oil than saudi arabia beginning in 2020. this is something almost on imagined 10 years ago. -- unimagined 10 years ago. what is the role of the federal government? >> to do things that encouraged the results. to follow up on the fiscal cliff. you can solve this fiscal problem if you grow our role to position relative to everybody else's. a big problem is the percentage
killed in a u.s. drone strike in the pakistani region of north waziristan. the attack targeted a home with a pair of missiles. pakistani intelligence says the victims were suspected militants. the syrian government is accusing western leaders of drumming up support for foreign military intervention by invoking a month on fears of chemical weapons. this week, president obama warned president bashar al-assad against chemical weapons, about an unspecified consequences. speaking to leaders in brussels, hillary clinton followed suit. >> our concerns are that an increasingly desperate assad regime may turn to chemical weapons, or may lose control of them to one of the many groups that are now operating within syria. so as part of the absolute unity we have on this issue, we have sent an unmistakable message that this would cross a red line. those responsible would be held to account. >> in response to the threat, assad's regime has assisted it will not use chemical weapons against its own people, calling an assertion to the contrary to a pretext for intervention. >timothy geithner is says t
three weeks left before the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff. >>> italian shares are down nearly 3% this morning. for the most part, it is bank stocks leading the way down. we're now down about 2.76% on the ftse mib. bank stocks have been hit particularly hard this morning. earlier, we saw shares down 5.6%. we're seeing the same thing, whether it's bmps hitting session lows down nearly 6% comes amid concerns about leadership and economic reform in italy following mario monte's announcement that he'll resign once the budget has been passed. this move is likely to bring the country forward to elections next year. the italian prime minister has offered no clue as to whether or not he will run and it comes after sylvia berlusconi declared over the weekend he would throw his hat in the ring for the job of premier. carolyn ross is in italy following the details there. can you walk us through the time frame here? when are we expected monte to step down? what happens next? >> good morning to you, kelly. here is the time frame for you. over the next few weeks, we're expecting the budget sta
a lot of what we read their is a discussion between u.s. regulators, foreign regulators and often concern on the harmonization between the two, and both the pro methodology use of language because many of us are starting to see a more complex world coming in where others multiple product wrapped in their and if there's a currency okay that might be exempt. there might be a package that actually has from both of you that sort of harmonization really does become important. is there a difference between the way your regulatory bodies are approaching these? >> we have worked together and harmonize on the definitions that you just mentioned about the swaps and mixed swaps and security based swaps so i think the public has a great deal of guidance and the rules but to the extent they need to come back on the package we would address it together. >> mr. cook do you have any incumbent new york city in different approaches is that cultural between the two regulatory bodies? >> i can't speak to the cftc statute but one of the reasons it drove us to the rulemaking in the context is that we l
in abe's previous cab net. he will have to dial with the relocation of the u.s. marine corps futenma air station, among other issues. itsunori onede virginia. is defense minister. he has chaired a special lower house committee on okinawa and other terrors to and head of the ldp's foreign affairs division. economic revival minister is akira amari and i will spearhead a new task force on that issue and also responsible for the council on economic and fiscal policy, which is being restored after it was cut by the previous government. >>> shinzo abe is bringing a wealth of experience with him back to the prime minister's office, not just from his career but also from the lessons taught to him by his family. politic it is run in abe's blood. his grandfather was a prime minister. his father severed as foreign minister. abe launched his political career about 20 years ago. voters elected him to the lower house. his father died while running for prime minister. >> translator: i will fulfill my grandfather's wish. >> reporter: he was deputy secretary when he attended a trip to north korea ten yea
it is not. america is the oldest country in the modern world. because the american constitution provided us with a template for classless democracy. not the america that she did but certainly that was the ideological template around it. india is important, 1947, because india is the oldest nation and the postcolonial world. and the indian constitution similarly creates an ideological template for democracy. but with the emergence of india also emerged china, and china had a different template. again, not getting into what is right and what is wrong, but these are alternative -- how to run your nation and postcolonial society. and very interesting we received in comparison to parties, won the congress and the chinese communist party. actually became the dominant force in the post-independent state. one advocate would have to be -- because both emerge from ravaged economically driven set of needs. the congress offered soft left. the chinese offered hard left, or autocratic left. a long story, both had -- >> you said long story shorter i want to get to the short part. spent discussing it with
on the skilled work force or how much there is a skill gap, i think this is a critical issue. i think that for us to have clear policies, we need to do a little better in clearly defining the challenge. first of all, i don't think there is any question that the main reason we are having higher unemployment right now is not structural. it is fundamentally cyclical, fundamentally the lack of demand that is still in our economy as we recover from the great recession. that said, that awareness, that recognition that ben bernanke and former cea sheriff lazar -- cea chair lazear should not undermine that we face temporary or futures skills gaps but there is three reasons we should be focused on this. number one, even the unemployment today that is fundamentally about cyclical demand can easily become the next structural skills problem of the future. we know that one of the challenges we face right now in our economy is not just lowering unemployment, but lower and long-term unemployment, and that if we allow regions of our fellow citizens to stay unemployed for year or two years or longer, we know from
work them up into a frenzy about the threats of theocracy. you use the comparison of iran. good lord. we are so far from any possible menace of religious orthodoxy. try to have a prayer at a high- school football game in texas. there is zero grounds. i do not see it. nor do i think in the members of the religious right, and i know many of them, any desire to tyrannize. they went into politics because they felt they were attacked. they want to be left alone. [applause] >> i appreciate you as a voice of reason. [inaudible] my question is more about historical and interpretation. what do think it keeps us so deeply in our ongoing philosophy of what democracy should be? >> that is a separate question. there are two in my ignorance. the continental french enlightenment and the british enlightenment. they differ radically. the british enlightenment was empirical and temperate. the french enlightenment was severe. one gave rise to be glorious revolution and eventually the american revolution. the french enlightenment gave rise to the french revolution and a blood bath. this sounds like a ph
>> wanna and v tonight. a huge break through for u.s. natural gas. a key government study could open the door for eorts and create a boom for the economy. the only thing standing the way though is present obama. we'll drill down with a natural gas company's ceo. >>> plus fighting crazy with crazy. could two plat nurm coins worth a trillion dollars each solve our debt crisis? is it as nuts as it sounds? bear with me here, people. our "money" power panel will break it down. >>> are plastic bags the way to extinction. they're completely banned in two cities. chicago wants to nix them. guess who is behind it? my favorite chicago alderman. i say stop the madness. but alderman joe moreno is here to disagree with me. even when they say it is a not it is always about money melissa: first let's take a look at today's market headlines. mediocrity apparently the reason to buy on wall street today. the november jobs report came in above expectations but the 146,000 jobs added is below average monthly growth for the past two years. that and 350,000 americans left the workforce. it all someh
stability and security of the asia-pacific as we protect u.s. national interest. and, of course, the keys to success will be innovative access agreements, greatly increased exercises, rotational presence increases, efficient force posture initiatives that will maximize the dollars that we are given to stand. and it also is by putting our most capable forces forward, as was her newest most advanced equipment to ensure we effectively operate with our allies and partners across a wide range of operations as we work together for peace and stability. i was asked to keep these opening remarks at little shorter than the last time, so i can get to your questions. so i'd like to finish up with a couple of thoughts. the rebalanced is based on a strategy of collaboration and cooperation. thought containment. and that the united states is a pacific power that will remain a pacific power, and we at pacom look forward to doing our part to keep asia is difficult full, peaceful and secure for decades to come. thank you. >> will take our first question writer spent admiral, thank you for meeting
with the internet to this emphasis on data and what data can tell us and the cloud has given us an enormous potential. >> completely. information technology in and of itself creates 5% or 10% of the value. connectivity is 10% of what it's about. the rest is about better decision making, better analytics, saving money. about doctors that know how to make better diagnoses. that's where the next wave is. that's where the action is. what we're saying is, look, industrial companies stay out of that at their own peril. it's no longer a day where you say "i'm going to make the engine and let a software guy decide how it flies." that's what we're focused on. >> rose: are there businesses that still now are in the part of g.e. that you want to spin off or do you have the core companies for the future? >> i think we've got the best portfolio we've had in a decade. financial services is a lot smaller than the last time i was on your show, for obvious reasons. but we're in the range of 60% to 70% of the country is industrial 30% to 40% is financial. that's a pretty good balance for us. so i'd say we're
they see igorer w lng around them. liss i knew ts house well, because i used to play across the street from it, anit had beautiful timbe inside and oak fors, and what we got in its place is this motrosity, which certainly esn't fit intoheeighborhood at all. they're pi, ey're fluf, they're g,hey'riendly,here. and it really annoys me that people come in here and don't wa to blend into the neighborhood. narrator: like lissa forshaw, man: jthey either didn't want ous an older house, or they didn't want to fixt up, or money was no object, swith houses cong down and new houses going up, d the w houses unfortunately withhe existg archture. a cole of years o, this was just like a new suburb. there was just simply such an incredible density narratorto geograph, olr uses le this oneonstruction. being replaced by newer ones like these, reflect more than just a local superficial trend. they are the result of global forces from f beyonthis region. here we are now in south shaughnessy in a street where i would guess more than half the houses have been rebuilt within the last five years, and it's a striki
. many of us believe on both sides of the aisle the fundamental reform of our tax code will help us get your economy moving faster and put more americans back to work. how we get there god only knows. >> president obama doesn't see it that way. >> at some point there's got to be i think a recognition on the part of my republican friends th that, you know, take the deal. they will be able to claim that they have worked with me over the last two years to reduce the deficit more than any other deficit reduction package. >> the ceo of pimco, one of the world's largest investors in bonds. mark standee is chief investor at moody's. and christine romans, host of "your bottom line." gdp, the broadest measure of the economy grew at an annual rate of 3.1% over the summer. we just got those numbers this week. that's more than double the rate of previous quarter. you can see the chart there. it's been choppy but looks like we're going in the right direction. america's economy is gaining pace, doing better than expected. we've been saying that 2013 could be the year of a real economic renaissance in
2011, mr. broussard, u.s. oncology. large producers and providers of health care products to major health care institutions. that background, mr. brousard brings a broad perspective on health care issues facing our country. mr. broussard holds his undergraduate degree from texas a&m and an mba from the university of houston. were very much looking forward to your comments today. thanks for being here. [applause] >> thank you. well, thank you. i really appreciate the opportunity from each one of you. our nation is actually wrestling -- [inaudible] a large amount of debt the united states is facing. i will outline the challenge we face. i'll also show you some transforming health care is one of the ways we can solve that issue. i'll demonstrate how new approaches to integrating the delivery system and how it is already achieving some result outside of the federal government. the health care can harness simplicity, has sustainability, even if the health care system undergoes some significant transformations. first, but to take a moment and talk about ohio and cleveland and how they're
just how nonlife- u.s. unemployment benefits are. a lot of the against -- non- lavish u.s. unemployment benefits are. the two countries that he mentioned, the netherlands and belgium, they're doing much better than other continental european countries. the scandinavian countries have guest: there is not this simple relationship that have been extensive unemployment insurance system and you mechanically generate a higher unemployment rate. host: lisa from dallas, texas, received unemployment insurance -- nate from dallas, texas, receives unemployment insurance. caller: right now i lost my job because my boss was fired from the university. and recently got my doctoral degree from that university, and i am spending eight hours a day on the computer, trying to network. i want to buck the contention that it is a mismatch of skills between the employer and the people that are unemployed. there was a recent "wall street journal" saying that part of the problem is how employers conduct searches of candidates, and her recruiting is done. -- how recruiting is done. i think the unemployment benefi
>>> the formalitier government is accused of being sent rick. >> massive write-downs n u.s. and brazil while warning over a week's global recovery. >>> and hsbc agreed to settle money laundering charges, paying a record $1.9 billion fine. >>> and we're getting the bumping out here today, not only because it's christmas, but -- >> because james ferguson is here. >> and we are finally in the same place at the same time. ♪ reunited and it feels so good ♪ >> there we go. >> my apologies to everyone for that. >> how about that voice? i feel a christmas sing along coming on at some point. >> it's the holt day spirit. >> it is. >> also, we are outside the u.s. senate. we're going to see just how much progress has been made or how little progress between the president and congress on the fiscal cliff situation. >>> and we'll find out just how much the european debt crisis has affected tourist's willingness to travel to southern europe. >> and then south korea's presidential election, yes, it's not just japan, and what to expect from the winner. >>> let's just plug you into wher
are facing now a possible theory of stearate using chemical weapons. they should've been abolished five or 10 years ago if the treaty had been enforced. so it seems to me, go for abolition of these weapons with good, thorough verification. i worked with inf despite the fact that two or three years before we got it, but that would be acceptable. >> rick, your turn. >> as the chairman of the global stearate u.s.a., i have to agree with jack. i won't expound on that. you know, there was no way when i was deeply involved in the issue in the early 80s that i could've foreseen gorbachev. nor could i foreseen the treaty. the zero option when it was propounded was preposterous. i post it. so did the secretary of state. reviewed this and i guess this is the lesson. we view this is largely a challenge and an opportunity and strengthen the alliance. we saw ourselves under threat. the doublecheck decision on deployment of the missiles was part of a broader political military exercise to strengthen the alliance to deal with whatever the next challenge we would face from the soviet union. what i have to sa
we'd like to add indicate -- advocate the things that people sent us here to do. if we have something to say in an amendment, if we're in the minority, we'd like to have the chance to make that amendment. what a number of us are doing, we've been talking, is how can we do two simple things, how can we make it easier for the majority leader to get bills to the floor and how can we make it easier for the minority especially to be able to offer amendments? if we can do those o things, madam president, at the beginning of the year, i think the united states senate will begin to function much more effectively. it will be a better place to work. we'll get our job done in a better way. there will be less finger pointing and more results. there will be a change in behavior, which is what we really need instead of a change in rules. and it will inspire the confidence of the people of the united states about the kind of job we're doing. thank you, mr. president. i yield the floor, and i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call:
in the u.s. which seems to be stabilizing, looking this also at the housing market. so business sentiment better than expected. it is rising. the current conditions a little weaker than expected. add to that the financial analyst numbers we had as of late, also better than expected. not too bad. >> patricia, we'll see you again next hour. thank you very much for following all the latest there. >> sure. >>> now, shares in ubs have edged up in early trade after the bank announced a major settlement with u.s., u.k., and swiss regulators over its role in the libor fixing scandal. with more we'll look at the story with carolyn roth with us on set. i guess we're expecting a settlement, expecting something big. what have we learned today? >> well, first of all, i mean, the market reaction -- ubs up by 1%, can you believe that? what barclays was hit with $450 million fine, i mean, we saw a big hit in barclays' share price. this fine is three time the amount that barclays was fined. $1.5 billion or $1.4 billion swiss>>frank: francs. this is on the libor manipulation charges. ubs must pay swiss reg
gdp, the entire economic output of the u.s. they have come down a little bit. economists think to be sustainable, budget deficits have to be in the range of 3% of economic output or a lower. the focus of this effort to reduce deficits now is on getting them, in the federal budget deficit to the range of 3% or so. that is what i mean when i say policymakers are not trying to get rid of the budget deficits. given the economic weakness, a little bit of deficit spending is probably not a terrible thing, at least in the eyes of some budget economists. i think there would be comfort in washington around 3% of gdp. getting there is a big challenge. there are problems with medicare and social security. they are facing big deficit situations. host: what motivates the creation of deductions? what about the other incentives? mortgage deduction it to encourage people to buy a home. guest: some of the deductions have been around forever, since the invention of the income tax. there has always been a deduction for interest that you paid. the government didn't think it could distinguish betwe
is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the u.s. health-care industry. dr. marty makary on what hospitals will not tell you, tonight it 10:00 -- at 10:00. >> the supreme court will look at what happened in 2008, and they will say that this precedent. and indiana had -- >> when we talk about the facts, they decided on the indiana case it was constitutional for them to establish i.d. states who have subsequently -- >> correct, they talked about indiana -- let me finish because you misrepresented what i said. the supreme court is the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people -- voter i.d. laws disproportionately affect minorities -- it seems to me somehow we have something missing in our brain. to me, if white americans can go throughto voting all the processes to follow the laws, what are you telling black people? that somehow they are not good enough? that is what bothers me about a lot of the rhetoric coming from democrats and the left, that we always have to make special -- you know, there has to be a specialness when we deal with
. this is about ten minutes. >> good evening, welcome and thank you for joining us. my name is richard fontaine. i'm the president for the center of new american security. it's a pleasure to welcome you all here to celebrate the publication of robert kaplan's new book the reason geography what they tell us about the coming conflict in the battle against the state. i've heard it said before that you all very great author by reading his books not by buying them -- they will be sold on the stage in this room back here. bald kaplan's work is known no doubt why this audience. he's been a senior fellow and in march of 2008 a foreign correspondent for the atlantic for about a quarter of a century and is currently the chief geopolitical analyst. i first became acquainted with his writing during his book with traces of history of the tight midwesterners living and working in the middle east. and since that book, the very titles of his work goes to the coming anarchy have provoked the debate. the recent book of american power has become acquired reading by those interested in the strategic competition in th
the problems facing the u.s. economy for about an hour and 45 minutes. next on book tv. [applause] >> thanks to the fashion institute of technology. unquestionably the most in the world today. [applause] in addition to being nobel laureates i would have to say from the vantage point for the economic thinking those would be my finalists. [applause] as you know, we've written a book that pertains to the challenges and circumstance the price of an equality. on behalf of them i thank you for your patronage and. let's start with paul. paul, you talked about and this depression now. a lot of people don't believe we could end this now. but agency deutsch human beings have to take on this challenge? something that is recognizably the same kind of animal. we victimize it is the same technology still there and skills are still there. look back to the 1930's and there are a lot of people making the argument that there were no easy answers and you could quickly get out of this [inaudible] and the 1939 and these are fundamental problems and if we want to make progress to cut unemployment benefits and thi
against the u.s. skimping on care. host: this from sasha -- guest: that is one proposal that gets floated by democrats. medicare part d bargains for drugs. i do not know -- i do not think it would be a cure all, the one proposal that would fix everything. democrats think it would reduce the cost of medicare. host: is there a plan b? guest: we have seen them as the january 1 deadline before and get 30-day extensions. at some point they were working without an extension. medicare told doctors to hold off on submitting your claims for a little bit. that is a situation we have ended up in before. if we're talking months, we're talking about big pay cuts for medicare doctors. that would be uncharted territory. host: joe from arizona on the republican line. caller: good morning. if we look at it logically, sarah is on the right track. we have become a society with honesty as a technicality. you can get more money but you break the law. our society -- you need to stop your people on the show, politicians and say, i asked you a question and you didn't answer it. this is why the doctors in medicar
head-on way than most countries. >> rose: including the united states? >> well, i think in the u.s. -- obviously you've got your own decisions to make about your fiscal problems and your issues and obviously your president and congress are engaging in that at the moment. but in the u.k. we have done that, we have got ahead of the curve and you can see in measures, for example, of how competitive the economies are, the you can is steadily becoming more and more competitive. >> rose: there's also this, the united states is engaged in this great debate that's going on in the white house with speaker of the house john boehner and the president of the united states, barack obama. what would be the optimal outcome of that debate as you look at it as a man who's dealing with the same kinds of problems? >> i'd say two things. one is we do need a resolution of this problem. i think the most immediate short-term problem facing the world economy-- i stress the word short term" is the u.s. fiscal cliff. i think if that is not resolved that is going to cause considerable problem for the world a
't happen again. >> clifton truman daniel will join us to discuss the inspiration for his trip sunday at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> a report by the group securing america's future energy says the greatest threat to national and economic security is dependence on foreign oil. members of the group, business political and retired military leaders are suggesting a plan of maximizing oil and gas production, reducing consumption, and improving conservation as a way to boost revenue and reduce our debt. this is a little less than an hour and a half. >> good morning, everyone. thank you all for coming. i especially want to thank the members of the leadership council that could be with us here today. they've been a distinguished group of people working on this issue since 2006. we're nothing without their credibility as the great c.e.o.'s, entrepreneurs and military leaders of our time. i also want to give a special thanks to the staff at securing america's future energy. really we stand on their shoulders, all of us, and the hard work that they -- and the time that they spent to put these re
negotiations. this is about a half an hour. [inaudible conversations] >> morning. thank you all for joining us this morning. i'm maya macguineas, i am working with the campaign to fix the debt, and i'm the president for the committee for a responsible federal budget, and i'm really excited to join a phenomenal panel that we have with us today to help the campaign fix the debt which is, um, a large, nonpartisan coalition that is focused on helping members of congress come together to put in place a comprehensive debt deal. so i'm very delighted that today what we have is a diverse and very experienced, um, group of panelists to talk about two major topics; tax reform and health care reform. all in the context of how are we going to work together to put in place a plan that would be able to tackle the nation's fiscal challenges. we will hear numerous different opinions, we will hear plenty of disagreement, and i hope we'll hear a lot of ideas about how to generate different, um, useful reforms to the budget that can help get a big deal put in place. and none of us should forget that what's going
. steve is going to be talking about their expansion right here in the u.s. including a three-star, upscale hotel. they had been focusing on the lower scale hotels. will that hurt their brand, or might it increase it? we'll be asking him. liz: first, what drove the markets in today's data download. stocks closing higher after struggling for direction early on with the dow crossing the flat line 25 times. all three major indices did post gains. technology had to be, right? was one of the best performers along with consumer discretionary. today's top performing sectors, health care and utilities, well, they did lag. the number of americans filing new applications for unemployment benefits falling for a third straight week as we remind you, thises the number you want to see fall. hurricane sandy's impact continues to slowly but surely subside. we had weekly jobless claims dropping by 25,000 last week to a seasonally-adjusted 370,000. the week's prior total was revised upward to 395,000 from 393,000. and treasury prices rising today, pushing yields back down to their lowest level
next guest. alex sharpton is with us. it is good to have you. the significance you think of an fha bailout, if it comes to that. >> i do not think it will be ruled out. we probably will have some type of popping off of the fha. if you look at where we stand right now, as an economy, we have a very modest recovery. it is most likely going to happen. connell: the significance of it is, in your mind, what? >> what needs to happen is we need to take note that we are subsidizing the fha again. while the fha is great for lower income borrowers, we are still allowing people to buy properties where they want after they post on the property, they are upside down on our property. that is where we need to be cautious. connell: we talk about it all the time, the housing numbers that are showing improvement. if people are only putting down, you know, the 3.5%, are we getting ourselves into a similar hole to the ones we are trying to dig ourseeves out of? >> unfortunately, we may have. the loans that the fha have increased in the past ten years, has increased tenfold. when you look at that type
rescue crews are working to free them from the rubble. i'll be back in one hour, so join us at the top of 3:00. we'll be talking about the supreme court. on friday the justices had a chance to tell us if they would weigh in on same sex marriage. find out why they aren't necessarily finished with the issue. plus, we sit down with brad pitt as he takes on the issue of same sex marriage. stay with cnn. "your money" starts right now. >>> the world is finally paying attention to the fiscal cliff, but you've known about the economic storm of our own making for months now. i i'maly velshi. this is "your money." i wasn't waiting to focus on this major threat to the economy. i wish others had. it would have given us more time to fix this major problem. at least now there's a focus on one thing and one dangerous man. a man who is not elected. who has never run pour office and is standing in the way after potential economic disaster. he's the ideological godfather of the tea party. grover norquist has been the driving force behind the anti-tax movement. his goal, to take big government
time really being called out as a problem. problem. >> dysfunction and u.s. health care industry. dr. marty makary on what hospitals won't tell you. his latest is an accountable. >> senate finance committee chair max baucus left capitol hill earlier this week to give his thoughts on what's called the fiscal cliff and negotiations that are currently underway. he spoke at an event hosted by campaign to fix the debt, a group cofounded by alan simpson and erskine bowles, the former coaches of the national commission on fiscal responsibility and reform. he spoke for about 15 minutes. >> welcome back, everybody. >> thank you. it was a traffic panel on health care. now we are really going to have a special guest. chairman baucus who is the chairman of the senate finance committee, and we will talk both about the budget negotiations that are going on now and the fiscal cliff, but what's really important is that both senator baucus and his counterpart in the house, chairman camp work together i believe on developing ideas for tax reform will be some of the lead folks who are shepherding whate
on this major threat to the economy. i wish others had. it would have given us more time to fix this major problem. now there is a focus on one thing and one dangerous man, a man who's not elected, who's never run for office, and is standing in the way of a potential economic disaster. he's been called a kingmaker, a patri patriot, and the ideological godfather of the tea party. since the mid 80s, grover norquist has been the driving force behind the anti-tax movement. his goal, to take big government and in his words, drown it in the bathtub. norquist's weapon is the taxpayer protection pledge which was at one point signed by 95% of gop members of congress. raise your hand if you feel so strongly about not raising taxes. >> on the campaign trail this year, only one republican presidential conditioned date, john huntsman, dared to cross him. norquist has clout. he is called the most powerful unelected man in america today. >> he signed a pledge, it's without congress. >> i'm not obligated on the pledge. >> republicans are jumping ship and supporting unspecified revenue hicks to cut the def
into this bill and the way he's worked cooperatively with all of us on both sides of the aisle and madam speaker, i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting this bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the chair will receive a message. the messenger: madam speaker a message from the senate. the secretary: madam speaker. the speaker pro tempore: madam secretary. the secretary: i have been directed by the senate to inform the house that the nat has passed without amendment h.r. 3641, cited as the national park act. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from utah. >> i have no fufert speakers and reserve the balance -- mr. chaffetz: i have no further speakers and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from the district of columbia. ms. norton: i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from utah. mr. chaffetz: i would like to thank representative poe for introducing this legislation. the intill bipartisan in its approach, it creates a means for properly commemorating the cent
target. talks about the level of u.s. production, rivalries between iran and saudi arabia, and a new secretary general could get heated. >>> italy likely to see a strong uptai uptake thanks to supply reductions before year end. >>> and let's twist again. the fed set to announce a fresh around of bond purchases to match the outgoing twist program at the end of the year. >>> the international community blasts north korea after it successfully launches a long-range rocket, prompting an emergency u.n. security council meeting. >>> all right. a very good morning to you. we are going to be on to opec later. we've got the latest i.a. data out this morning. they're saying global oil demand projected around 90.5 million barrels a day. more than forecast. they say non-opec production bouncing back. an something bit. they're saying opec crude supply inched up in november led by higher output from saudi arabia. >> i think we'll have to call this today the case of the two oil reports. we have the opec report that they put out ahead of the meeting showing different figures from what the iea is say
to help us celebrate this stupid milestone, can we call it that? not really. "mad" magazine writer, good morning dick bedebartolo. >> let me read this one line. as of his byline in issue 502 in 2009, your material has appeared in 400 consecutive issues of "mad" magazine dating back to 1966, my friend. >> yeah, yeah. >> you are a veteran. >> i've been paid for five of those issues. >> but you ne what? >> the check's in the mail. >> but you get paid? >> yes. it's 20 years i've been on "world news now" too. >> wow. >> the first time i ever sat at the adult table. >> really? >> yeah, yeah. >> we haven't been there that long either. >> if you want to quantify us as adults. >> how did you get started, though? >> i was back in high school, reading "mad." i thought, i don't want to read this, i want to write this. so i wrote a satire and i read in a magazine, if you submit something, send a self-addressed stamped envelope. otherwise, they'll throw it out if it's rejected. so six weeks later, i get my envelope back. i'm heart broken. i open the envelope, and it's stuffed with cardboard. the cardb
of that will be on hold obviously until they figure out what's going on. >> keep us posted for certain. we expect the best. back in 1998 she call it a blood clot and called it one of the scariest mediciedical experienc her life. >> if you had one before, you are at higher risk, and if you travel a lot, the blood flow may be compressed, benning your legs like that, and with the concussion, one of the things she was told was to rest. not easy for her to do, i can tell you for a fact. that may be part of the inactivity. >> and we don't know what the cause is. back in 1998, it was deep vain thrombosis. >> dvt, a clot in one of the leg veins, in and of itself, not a problem, but it can break off and go to the lungs, called a pulmonary embolism, she is on blood thinners, and you treat the brain clot. this is within one of the blood vessels in her legs. they haven't told us. >> what do they do about this? once you have had an episode of dvt, what's the treatment? >> blood thinners, you want to tip the balance a little bit so you are more likely to break up the clot. the downside, rumor likely to bleed if you inj
remain before the u.s. goes over the edge. that means tax hikes and spending cuts that could trigger another recession. congressional leaders will meet today at 3:00 p.m. eastern time. the full house not even expected to return to work until sunday. here is the guest list for today's showdown. the president, vice president biden, senate majority leader harry reid and house minority leader nancy pelosi on the democratic side. house speaker john boehner, mitch mcconnell representing the republicans. brianna keilar live from washington. what do we expect to happen today? any new offers from the president or house speaker? >> we don't know. right now, all eyes on the senate to see what senate majority leader harry reid can cobble together to get some republican support. technically, it's still possible to come to an agreement. that said, politically is a different story, and the prospects for coming to a deal are starting to dim. right now, we're hearing a whole lot of the blame game. a lot of public posturing from both sides as they prepare for the possibility of going over the cliff. l
larger water heaters are within the scope of the energy policy act and are rated using a thermal efficiency or t.e. rating. the problem facing american manufacturers is that under the current rules of the road only the small water heaters are deemed eligible for the energy star program. this is nonsensical. it's an outdated measure. and disqualifies our large american made water heaters from being covered by the energy star ratings, regardless of how advanced or how highly efficient they may be. . the legislation before us today would provide the necessary regulatory and business certainty that is needed by our manufacturers. this legislation has the potential of adding upwards of 1,000 jobs for domestic water heater manufacturers, many of them are in my home state of tennessee, where there are already 3,000 jobs directly involved in the manufacturing of water heaters. i thank the chairman again. i thank mr. aderholt and i also want to commend the gentleman and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the ge
say the slow down in nonfarm payrolls will reflect the effect of sandy. joining us this hour is bank of america merrill lynch global research senior research economist michelle mire and we'll talk through everything that's been happening through jobs and what to expect. but first, there is a developing story. an earthquake off the northeast coast of japan triggered a tsunami warning. the warning has been lifted, but it was a 7.3 quake. so far no reports of any injuries or damage. it was for the same area devastated by an earthquake and tsunami back in march of last year. we will continue to bring you any developments. in the meantime, steve has some of the morning's top other stories. >> let's start with the markets. asian stocks rallying to 2012 highs overnight. the nikkei edging lower after hitting a se hitting hitting a seven month closing high yesterday. european trading, shares seem to be fwllat. bundesbank announced it had cut its growth outlook for the country. in the u.s., the nasdaq snapped its losing streak yesterday with its first gain in five days. the dow was on pace for
reading. >> thank you for spending three hours with us. >> thank you. >> i would think all the technical -- it's different this time. i know you've never heard that before. i have a very special announcement, once again. i want to say happy birthday to blake hernon, who is now officially a teenager. 13 years young. >> he'll be voting democratic in five years. >> absolutely. >> "squawk on the street" starts right now. happy birthday, blake. >>> good morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." hope you all had a good christmas. i'm melissa lee. we're live from the new york stock exchange. jim cramer has the day off. the latest s&p schiller home price report has been released. the results being shown at the bottom of your screen. david blitzer will join us with a closer look at the numbers in just a few minutes. let's get a check on how we're setting up on this day after christmas trading session. the dow looking higher by about 15 points. s&p looking at about two points at the open. european markets closed on this day after christmas. the uk and france among those celebrating foxing day. w
in vinegar and. we may as well have tomorrow's conversation today. >> it seems as if this helps us understand what is going on. i will bring a new perspective to the fullest fiscal cliff. connell: please. >> what the democrats have been trying to do is get the republicans to agree to raising the rates on [people. if they were to do that, it would at this rate the republican brand which is the do not raise tax rates. connell: they do not care what the level is? >> right. that is what republicans want to run on. if they agree on increases around $20,250,000, then the democrats could say you are not any different than us. what they are trying to do with the million dollar limit is basically take that problem off the table. i think he is actually succeeding with that which is what it would be very hard to agree with that million dollar figure. it will not go very far. the other side of it is the spending in this the questioner. this is the it part of the fiscal cliff. connell: if you look at interest rates, today we bring up the ten year yield, the real movement on this, the real solution to the
'll be great. and there were those of us at the time who said that's not going to work. and the reason we said back then is it's not going to work if you put in this year a big surge in government spending, even if that makes gdp go up this year, next year it goes down again. so if we're going to do to policies they're going to recommend, we had to know it would be great next year, and we could afford to lose the 2% growth, and we'd take the stimulus away. since that didn't seem plausible at the time, what we argued back then -- i could e-mail you testimonies -- was that we need to pursue policies somewhat reminiscent of what we see in the 4% growth chapter now. we were talking about what next steps should be, and there wasn't a democratic senator in that hearing who was willing to defend the stimulus on the record. and i was, i was being, you know, pretty combative in my testimony, and nobody argued with me. and the point is that the economy is still terrible. i think 2% is actually optimistic for what we're growing right now. and everybody wants to do something to fix it, and that's a great
. the guy in the back. >> is today the ambassador to syria reiterated the fear that if the u.s. provides weapons to the syrian opposition they will wind up in the hands of extremists. i was wondering if you could speak about what the new coalition is specifically doing to build a closer relationship with the three syrian army and various militias fighting on the ground. it seems more likely the syrian opposition will receive assistance if the new coalition can show they are in away unified with the people doing the fighting. >> thank you. >> the u.s. position has been repeated many times that we will not give assistance, it may go to the wrong hands. if the u.s. stays in its position, they are getting the money from some groups in the gulf countries or in other areas. you can play a role in the transition rather than waiting until the transition is done. the lack of support, we see the increasing influence of t. this is the fear we have. this is a shared concern of the international community. we do not need the nature of the syrian people -- committed to the international community and
, december 16, 2012. the flag over the u.s. capitol, over the white house, and in many locations across the country are at half staff today because of friday's school shooting in newtown, conn.. the nation's newspapers are full of details about what happened on friday. we would like to hear from you your opinions on how america can prevent mass shootings. is it the role of government or society to stop them? here are the numbers to call. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. you can also find us online. send us a tweet, twitter.com/c- spanwj. or join the conversation on facebook by looking for c-span and weighing in. you can also e mail us, journal@c-span.org. here is the first page -- front page of "the hartford current" this morning. "day of grieving." the top headline, along with a list of the victims. the employees, all women. the children, all around the age of 67. this is "the sunday bulletin." "residents gather to find comfort and pray." national newspapers also digging into this story. "the new york times" says that the peopl
to the atmosphere. on the other hand, people who are living in a western-style exist then use a lot more energy than people in the developing world. one of the terms in the product of terms from which we deduce future carbon emissions is global population. we tend to believe the global population will stabilize with 10 billion people by the middle of the century because the developing world will take on some of the characteristics of the western world in terms of their rate of production, for example. when you look at some of those projections, built into many of them is the assumption that the global population will eventually stabilize. if it does not do that, it means that the problem is even worse. that is the key uncertainty, the wild card. >> the bottom-line is a really nice where people are in the world, but how many people want a u.s. lifestyle. >> thomas rÜgen talks about an america that has 3 billion people. >> my name is wayne rauf. it is -- wayne rth. what will it take to make the sacrifices to save our planet? my basic metaphor for what we're doing to plan a is putting a stick in a hor
advised seven u.s. presidents. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. [applause] >> i interview a lot of fantastic people in this room and that does not happen very often. in 1988, nasa scientist james hansen told a congressional hearing that it was 99% certain that burning fossil fuels was heating the earth's atmosphere. the next day, a new york times headline proclaimed a "global warming has begun." decades later, dr. hansen and others are still trying to convince the united states of these basic observations. about half of american now accept the fact. 40% do not. over the next hour, we will discuss clients -- climate science and public opinion with james hansen. today, dr. hansen is receiving [applause] i've interviewed a lot of fantastic people in this room and that doesn't happen very often. welcome to climate one, a conversation about america's energy, economy and environment. i'm greg dalton. in 1988, nasa scientist james hansen told a congressional hearing that it was 99% certain that burning fossil fuels was heating the earth's atmosphere. the next day, a new york times head
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